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Recognizing a Stroke

Recognizing a Stroke

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A caregiver advises on how to recognize a stroke

As professional caregivers, we understand that symptoms of a stroke are sometimes difficult to identify. Unfortunately, the lack of awareness spells disaster. The stroke victim may suffer severe brain damage when people nearby fail to recognize the symptoms of a stroke. Now doctors say a bystander can recognize a stroke by asking three simple questions: S - Ask the individual to SMILE. T - Ask the person to TALK and SPEAK A SIMPLE SENTENCE COHERENTLY. R - Ask him or her to RAISE BOTH ARMS. If he or she has trouble with ANY ONE of these tasks, call 911 immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher. *A NEW SIGN OF A STROKE - STICK OUT YOUR TONGUE Ask the person to stick out his/her tongue. If the tongue is 'crooked' - if it goes to one side or the other - that is also an indication of a stroke.

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Do you need caregiving support for an at-risk loved one? Then contact Qualicare today. Our medical case managers and at home care providers are here to help you.

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